Hi Mamma...

Are you Currently struggling with Peeing your pants, Painful sex, and just getting your body back after baby?

TAKE THE QUIZ TO DISCOVER HOW YOU CAN FIND A BETTER WAY THAn "JUST LIVE WITH IT"...

FACT
Did you know that, on average, during pregnancy, a woman has 10 doctor's appointments. Compared to 1 doctor’s appointment 6 weeks after they give birth. 

FACT
During the 6-week check up, their OBGYN usually clears them to return back to their normal activities. In reality, the 6 week mark is when you should start a gentle workout and normally it takes more than a few MONTHS to be ready to “return to normal.” Standard of care research shows that it is best practice to begin pelvic floor, core strengthening and exercise at about 50% max effort from 6 weeks-4 months postpartum. The 4 month mark is typically the set mark for return to vigorous, high level exercise.

FACT
60% of women experience diastasis recti (abdominal separation) in the second trimester and 90% in the third trimester? Untreated this results in mamma pooch that won’t go away.

FACT
90% of the clients I work with are never educated on the pelvic floor and how to properly care for themselves postpartum? 

FACT
Of the 20 hours I spent in Mom-To-Be Classes, not once did I learn about how to take care of myself postpartum. 

Allie Flowers
Doctor of Physical Therapy
Postpartum Corrective Exercise Specialist

Take the pelvic floor and core health quiz

And Receive My Top ten things you didn’t know about pelvic health Guide For FREE.

Take the pelvic floor and core health quiz

And Receive My Top ten things you didn’t know about pelvic health Guide For FREE.

FACT
Did you know that, on average, during pregnancy, a woman has 10 doctor's appointments. Compared to 1 doctor’s appointment 6 weeks after they give birth. 

FACT
During the 6-week check up, their OBGYN usually clears them to return back to their normal activities. In reality, the 6 week mark is when you should start a gentle workout and normally it takes more than a few MONTHS to be ready to “return to normal.” Standard of care research shows that it is best practice to begin pelvic floor, core strengthening and exercise at about 50% max effort from 6 weeks-4 months postpartum. The 4 month mark is typically the set mark for return to vigorous, high level exercise.

FACT
60% of women experience diastsis recti (abdominal separation) in the second trimester and 90% in the third trimester? Untreated this results in mamma pooch that won’t go away.

FACT
90% of the clients I work with are never educated on the pelvic floor and how to properly care for themselves postpartum? 

FACT
Of the 20 hours I spent in Mom-To-Be Classes, not once did I learn about how to take care of myself postpartum. 

Allie Flowers
Doctor of Physical Therapy
Postpartum Corrective Exercise Specialist

THERE’S ANOTHER WAY!

That most of my clients report being told that it’s normal to leak, have discomfort with sex and never quite get their abdominal strength back? I’m here to tell you that this is NOT normal and that you do not have to suffer. Our bodies are made to heal. 

I have helped hundreds of women take charge of their pelvic health, restore core function and heal their bodies after having a baby. After experiencing my own difficulties after having two babies, I am passionate about educating women on how to properly care for their pelvic floor and core postpartum and come out stronger than ever. If you are suffering from pelvic pain, leaks when exercising or exerting yourself, painful sex, a lower belly aka “mom pooch” or just want to learn more about pelvic health and restoring your core then you are in the perfect place! 

Take the pelvic floor and core health quiz

Learn all about the pelvic floor and core, how it all functions and why you may be experiencing symptoms such as a lower belly pooch, diastasis recti(abdominal separation), leaks, painful sex, pelvic pain and why it’s so important to take the time to heal ( and learn to breath properly) postpartum. 

And Receive My Top ten things you didn’t know about pelvic health Guide For FREE.

START WITH MY QUIZ AND FIND THE WHY THAT'S HOLDING YOU BACK!

1. Do you struggle to get rid of a lower belly pooch or find it difficult to tone and build strength in your abs?

You are not alone!

Whether you have had a baby or not, many women find this to be a persistent problem they want to fix! Did you know having a lower belly pooch is actually more so a pressure management problem? It means you are not properly distributing daily pressure ( from activities such as lifting, exercising, housework) evenly in combination with not properly activating your lower abdominals. The result? The pressure tends to go down into the lower belly causing a “pooch” appearance and thus pressure extends down into the pelvic floor. The good news? This is completely fixable! First of all it’s important to understand how our anatomy works and that we actually have an upper, middle and lower transverse abdominus muscle which acts as a deep corset to keep our spine safe. If you are not activating all three parts of this muscle evenly along with the lateral abdominal muscles ( external and internal obliques) and perhaps overusing your rectus abdominus ( 6 pack muscle); along with an improper breathing pattern, it makes it almost impossible to get rid of that pooch and flatten your tummy! It also makes it very difficulty to build proper strength.
Want to learn more? All the details of how to fix this will be outlined in my new course, heal your abs, core and pelvic floor.

2. Have you been diagnosed with diastasis recti and looking to heal yourself postpartum and confused on where to start?

I don’t blame you!

This can be so overwhelming. First of all, what is diastasis recti? Glad you asked, because I happen to be an expert in this area. Let’s talk a little bit of anatomy first. The rectus abdominus muscle is our big six pack muscle, which is connected in the front by what we call the linea alba. Then we have our lateral abdominal muscles which consist of three groups: external obliques, internal obliques and transverse abdominus ( our deepest layer, think our abdominal corset which stabilizes our spine.) The rectus abdominus muscle is encased in a sheath which forms from the aponeurosis of the lateral abdominal muscles….. the linea alba. A diastasis recti is basically a stretching of that linea alba. It creates a “gap like” appearance or separation in between the big rectus abominus muscle. This is actually a normal part of pregnancy…things stretch! Which is why when we measure the extent of a diastasis we look for not only how wide the gap is ( more than two fingers is considered positive) we also look at how firm it is and how a person is able to properly contract that deeper transverse abdominus muscle. The good news? Diastasis recti is fixable, however there is no quick one stop exercise that fixes it. It involves a comprehensive approach to learning how to properly breathe, manage pressure, contract your abdominals evenly, correctly strengthen and learning how to properly progress to more challenging exercises.
Interested in learning more?

3. Do you find that you leak a little bit when you exert yourself, such as running, jumping or even coughing or sneezing?

Did you know that this is not in fact normal 
whether you have had a baby or not? 

This could mean that you have a weak pelvic floor. So what exactly is the pelvic floor? To simplify, we can look at the pelvic floor as a superficial and deep layer. Superficially you have your urogenital triangle ( think holding in urine) and your anal triangle ( think holding in gas). Then you have your deeper layer or pelvic diaphragm. These are the muscles that provided the support to your pelvic cavity, acting like a sling. I also like to consider some of our hip muscles part of the pelvic floor as well because of how everything functions together. The pelvic floor is responsible for stability, support, sexual function, posture, helps to support the low back and helps modulate pressure and breathing. So pretty darn important if you ask me. Therefore the pelvic floor needs to be functioning properly. It needs to be strong in itself without compensation from other muscle groups. If you are suffering from any of the above symptoms, know that it can be fixed with a good comprehensive pelvic floor strengthening program that includes proper breathing, core and hip work! Try this quick trick the next time you feel you have to cough or sneeze and are worried about leaking. Contract your pelvic floor (do a kegel, think about pulling a marble up into you squeezing your pelvic floor muscles around it) before you cough or sneeze. This is called “the knack”

4. Do you experience painful sex, the need to urinate right after you just went to the bathroom or pelvic pain?

Just as it is important for our pelvic floor...

Just as it is important for our pelvic floor to be strong it also needs to not be “too tight.” Let me explain this a little more. A muscle that is too tight and can never fully lengthen can never fully be strengthened. Therefore, you end up in this chronic state of tightness and muscle spasm which can become quite problematic. Oftentimes, painful sex and pelvic pain that isn’t responding to traditional strengthening is due to a tight pelvic floor versus a weak one. What causes a tight pelvic floor? It can be stress, childbirth, compensation for other weak hip and abdominal muscles not doing their job, and poor pressure management. What are some things you can do to help? Some truly helpful tips I have seen in my practice include meditation, relaxation, yoga, stretches to lengthen the pelvic floor, self-massage and release techniques and proper breathing. Furthermore, building strength in the surrounding hip and core muscles so the pelvic floor does not have to work so hard is key factor for lasting results as well. Bottom line is that this is treatable. Interested in learning more?

5. Are you looking for a program to tone and strengthen your core and pelvic floor safely postpartum while allowing for proper healing? Do you wonder why breathing properly is so important?

Then look no further!

It can be so difficulty and overwhelming to get started on an exercise program after giving birth. Especially when it comes to building strength while allowing your body to do its job to heal. I always tell you moms to start with breathing first. Why? Because you cannot heal your core if you cannot breathe properly. During pregnancy, we undergo so many postural changes that impact our diaphragm and this tends to force us to become shallow breathers ( a.k.a all neck and chest muscles). This is not optimal! Our diaphragm is our major muscle of breathing and it directly connects to the pelvic floor and our abdominals. If you do not focus on restoring normal breathing first postpartum, you won’t be able to get good abdominal and pelvic floor activation making it difficult to get the results you are looking for. Thus breathing is the foundation for proper healing. The good news? All it takes is a little practice and some of my favorite tricks for improving your breathing patterns! This program focuses on connecting the core, pelvic floor and breathe for the best possible results. There is no easy quick fix to repairing your abdominals postpartum, however this program serves as a detailed comprehensive guideline designed to get you back on track at your own pace. Heal your abs core and pelvic floor focuses on proper breathing, proper pressure management, proper spinal mobility, abdominal engagement and proper strength progression for lasting results.
Copyright 2021 | Allie Flowers
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